Whoopie Sling Guy Line Tensioners

posted in: Backpacking, DIY, Hiking, Shelter | 4

I am surprised you can’t buy whoopie sling guy lines. I am even more surprised that high-end tents don’t come with them as standard. They have to be the lightest and most elegant option. You will have to make your own. I would say that the 1.75mm ‘Zing It’ would be an ideal size for the novice to work with.  They are an elegant solution, and an interesting hobby to wile away the idle hours of a night (when you aren’t camping/hiking). Here is an informational: ‘How to make a whoopie sling’: https://www.animatedknots.com/whoopiesling/index.php It is really quite straightforward. All you need is a largish needle.

PS: Learn all about (and buy) whoopee slings and adjustable ridgelines here: https://www.whoopieslings.com/

Some other information about dyneema cord: https://www.arrowhead-equipment.com/blog/the-dope-on-rope For DIY, cord available eg here: https://dutchwaregear.com/product/zing-it-or-lash-it/ or here: https://www.tiergear.com.au/shop/shelter-systems/guylines-ridgelines-and-hardware/mallee-wire-1-75mm-dyneema-cord-per-metre

PS: Dyneema braid comes in even thinner styles, so that You could probably choose something like a 1 mm braid for guy lines on an ultralight tarp and never have one fail.

Further: In answer to a reader’s question, ‘How do you use them with tents?‘ Answer: You use it as an adjustable guy line (instead of using a tensioner like this: http://www.theultralighthiker.com/the-perfect-guy-line-for-a-hiking-tenttarp/). You would loop the eye for example through the tie out, then bring the rest of the whoopie through the eye. The adjustable loop would be attached to your stake. You tighten he guy by pulling on the tail.

See Also:

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/whoopie-slings-what-a-great-idea/

https://hummingbirdhammocks.com/tree-straps/

http://www.tiergear.com.au/11/products/adjustable-hammock-ridgeline

https://shop.whoopieslings.com/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/a-hummingbird-in-the-hand/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/australian-outfitter/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/make-your-own-tarp-or-hammock/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/diy-netless-hammock/

Other hammock related posts:

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hammock-hunting-till-dark/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/a-hummingbird-in-the-hand/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/adjustable-hammock-ridgeline/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/continuous-loop-another-great-hammock-idea/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/whoopie-slings-what-a-great-idea/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/side-insulation/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hammock-pad-extender/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/diy-netless-hammock/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/klymit-hammock-pad/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/make-your-own-tarp-or-hammock/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hammock-camping-double-bunking/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hammock-hunting-till-dark/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/all-in-one-hammock-tent-poncho-backpack-at-1-2-kg/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/laybag/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/all-you-ever-need-to-know-about-tarps/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/tier-gear-catenary-cut-hex-tarp/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/900th-post/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/sleeping-pad-reinvented-big-agnes-q-core-slx/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/modifyingshortening-hiking-mats/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/catenary-cut-tarp/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/thermarest-speedvalve/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/upper-yarra-track-section-seven-mushroom-rocks-carpark-to-phillack-saddle/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hole-less-ponchoshelter/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hammocks/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hammock-camping/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/the-ultralight-deer-hunter/

http://www.theultralighthiker.com/hunting-in-fiordland/

4 Responses

  1. Nate

    Hammockforums.net is a gold mine for this sort of information. Try googling the phrase “hammockforums ucr”. They have very good sticky posts as well.

  2. Nate

    May I also suggest, as an alternative to a whoopie sling, a Universal Climbing Rope (UCR). It’s pretty much the same thing, except that the adjustable part isn’t a loop; it’s just a single strand that slides back and forth over the first strand. Both strands have fixed loops in their ends for attaching to things. I made my UL hammock suspension out of Dynaglide (1.8mm Spectra) using UCRs, and they work very well (but it’s not recommended you use Dynaglide for this purpose – it doesn’t have the minimum suggested “safety margin” [I’ll take my chances]). In Amsteel Blue, I still prefer a whoopie, but either will work.

    And regarding the question of why they’re not more popular as guylines, they’re expensive if you get them pre-made, due to the labor I guess. And, it seems like a lot of folks are still scared off by the idea of splicing their own cordage, sort of how a lot of folks don’t want to do their own sewing (I’m always surprised how many DIY articles I find online that have “no-sew” versions). That’s weird to me, because I find both skills to be enjoyable and save money.

    Another possible reason for their lack of popularity may be that, using the whoopie’s loop, you can’t cinch it any closer to the ground than the required length of the bury (~8″ for Amsteel Blue 7/64″, less for thinner cordage). Or maybe just not that many people have thought of it?

    • admin

      I can’t find the UCR with a Google search but I think I see what you mean. It is the splice which locks on to the cord that is the vital part to act as a tensioner. I’m sure people could have such gu lines made very cheaply in the third world such that I am surprised one does not see them particularly on the long guys on tents.

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